How do I identify hearing loss?

Hearing loss begins gradually.

When a person doesn’t hear as well anymore, it’s usually other people who realize it first. Friends and family members begin to notice that someone is asking them to repeat themselves more often than usual, speaking unusually loudly on the telephone, or turning the TV up to where even the neighbors can hear it.

Hearing loss creeps up little by little as the brain gets used to not hearing certain frequencies or sounds. Experts refer to this as “auditory deprivation”. Usually, people affected by it don’t notice it at all. But the later the brain is reminded of the long-forgotten frequencies with the aid of a hearing system, the longer it takes for the person to be able to perceive them and accept them at their normal volume again. This is why it’s so important to prevent the brain from getting tired in the first place. The earlier you decide to start using a hearing system, the easier the path back to normal hearing will be for you.

Did you know…?

Determining which hearing system is right for you isn’t just a question of the anatomy of your ear and your degree of hearing loss. Your audiologist will also ask you about how you spend your free time. Click here to learn more about the different hearing systems available and what the process of choosing a hearing system is like.